Oman’s Maritime and Shipbuilding Heritage

Oman’s Maritime and Shipbuilding Heritage

12/01/2022 by Jonathan Bentham The Sultanate of Oman has a notable maritime tradition. Situated at the south-eastern corner of the Arabian Peninsula, it is isolated terrestrially from the rest of the Asian continent. Despite this, its advantageous location at a maritime crossroads has influenced its development significantly. Its access to the Gulf of Oman, the Gulf of Aden, the Arabian Sea, and the wider Indian Ocean has shaped it and its people for centuries. Historical Maritime Activity There is evidence of maritime travel between Egypt and the Dhofar region of Oman in the southern part of the country that stretches...

The Rachid Karame International Fair in Tripoli

The Rachid Karame International Fair in Tripoli

05/01/2022 by Elie Saad and Edmond Mickel Rahme On 3rd September 1962, Rachid Karami, the Lebanese prime minister, presented an architectural mode l at a press conference. It was made of cardboard, stitched with various curvilinear shapes and forms, united by a flat surface that joined the two extremities of the drawn plot at the base. Little did the minister know that this project would hold his name in the far future, and that it would take part in the history of modern architecture of the Middle East. In 1958, under President Camille Chamoun, it was decided to build an...

Morocco, reweaving yarns of a faded embroidery

Morocco, reweaving yarns of a faded embroidery

16/10/2021 by Nassima Chahboun Introduction: Al Matrouz (from Arabic: المطروز, literally: the embroidered) is a Moroccan musical concept that is no longer widely performed.[1] Its poetic name is in reference to the artistic intertwining of components from four distinct cultures: Stanzas from Moroccan Darija, which is a mixture of Arabic vocabulary and Amazigh syntax, are harmoniously inserted into Hebrew poetry, and performed to the tune of Andalusian melodies.[2]  Therefore, every Matrouz song is a colourful embroidery in which some yarns are Arab, while others are Andalusian, Jewish and Amazigh.  Al Matrouz is also a reminder that the current Arabo-Islamic cities...

Master Mohammad Reza Shajarian

Master Mohammad Reza Shajarian

08/10/2021 by Mr Mohammad Shirkavand and Ms Atieh Jafar Nazari Introduction: Master Mohammad Reza Shajarian (1940-2020) sang an evolved form of Persian music as his understanding of Persian songs was deep and distinctive. He collected and integrated the old methods with his expertise and then passed them on to the next generations. Mohammad Reza Shajarian was gifted a voice that has revived traditional Persian music and played a role as influential as Ferdowsi, the Poet whose works preserved the Persian language in literature starting 900 years ago. He was a hero from the art world who elevated the country’s existence...

Riad al-Solh, a triangular square

Riad al-Solh, a triangular square

27/09/2021 par Elie Saad “Is a triangle space able to integrate the club of public squares? If so, why do we even call it a square and not just a space or why don’t we call every space by its geometrical shape? Maybe this is why the Riad al-Solh Square isn’t really a living public space, maybe the real reason is its triangular shape” – Elie Saad Currently known as a place of major protests, especially due to the 2019 uprising, the Riad al-Solh Square is nevertheless one of the oldest squares and public spaces in Beirut dating back to...

HERITAGE BUILDINGS IN  DHI QAR AND MAYSAN

HERITAGE BUILDINGS IN DHI QAR AND MAYSAN

17/09/2021 par Muntadher Aloda The summary This article sheds light on the most important challenges facing heritage buildings in southern Iraq, especially in the Provinces of Dhi Qar and Maysan that account for a number of historical buildings that belonged to Jewish and Mandaean families. Others belong to Christians and Muslims, similar to the buildings in the areas of Baghdad, Babylon, Basra, Diyala, and elsewhere. Heritage houses, or historical houses as they are called in different languages, survive despite the migration of their original owners, and the various obstacles and challenges that stand in the way of the sustainability of...

Taza, the Medina of shimmering words and pale stones

Taza, the Medina of shimmering words and pale stones

10/06/2021 by Nassima Chahboun The city of Taza lies at the saddle between the Atlas and the Rif mountains, in the north of Morocco. The medina (from the Arabic word madinah, meaning “city”) is the historic part that dates back to the pre-Islamic era and represents an urban and architectural palimpsest illustrating the succession of several Islamic dynasties.[1] Due to its strategic location at the crossroads between the east and the west, Taza played a key role in the geopolitical transformations of the Moroccan kingdom until the start of the French protectorate.[2] After independence, the epic of this city came...

Embroidery as an intangible heritage. A Palestinian story

Embroidery as an intangible heritage. A Palestinian story

19/05/2021 by Shyrine Ziadeh “When I embroider, I feel close to my homeland.” Feryal Abbasi-Ghnaim, a Palestinian embroiderer Palestinians have a rich and fascinating history in folk arts. Silk thread and embroidery, together with an expanding repertoire of symbols, are known to have made their way from China to the Holy Land along the Silk and Spice Routes before being introduced to Europe by Christian saints, holy men, and pilgrims. However, what is Palestinian embroidery? And what does it mean to the Palestinian people? This and more will be discussed in-depth through this paper. Laila El Khalidi, a Palestinian author...

The Suqs of Old Mosul: The complexity of time and space

The Suqs of Old Mosul: The complexity of time and space

12/05/2021 by Omar Mohammed For centuries, the Old Suqs played a crucial role in developing and preserving a socio-economic system that facilitated coexistence in Mosul. They not only served as the economic core of the city, but they also brought the different groups of Mosul society together in a complex but solid social structure The Old Suqs (Bazaars) of Mosul, the heart of the city’s social identity, were severely damaged during the battle to retake the city from ISIS. For centuries, the Old Suqs played a crucial role in developing and preserving a socio-economic system that facilitated coexistence in Mosul....

Hard Shelled, Hard Future? The Turtle Sanctuary at Ras al-Jinz

Hard Shelled, Hard Future? The Turtle Sanctuary at Ras al-Jinz

20/04/21 by Jonathan Bentham Nature strives for equilibrium. Every so often, it will go about this with a touch of irony. The Middle East is so often depicted in terms of its crises. Just north of the Arabian Peninsula, overlooking the Mediterranean Sea, a civil war rages on in Syria. Another war seethes at the peninsula’s South-Western corner, in Yemen, overlooking the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. Both of these wars have displaced millions of people.[1] It is with some irony then, that at the peninsula’s eastern-most point, Ras al-Jinz, overlooking the Gulf of Oman and the Arabian Sea,...